This is a page from the website www.truecanada.ca developed by Hilary Stokes and partner.  Visit this site for some wonderful information about our country.  Below is Hilary's explanation of why they chose Sudbury. 

"We are often asked why to chose to move to Canada, but more particularly why we chose Sudbury. At first glance, a relatively small working town in North-Eastern Ontario, known mainly for its mining industry and its harsh winters hardly seems like the ideal destination.

Look in any Canadian tourist guide, a few editions out of date, and you’ll see that the Sudbury wasn’t rated highly as a top tourist spot. In fact, it had a reputation as an ugly, rather dull, town, ravaged by pollution from the nickel and copper mines, which are still a mainstay of the city’s industry. In fact, all we have to do to see the effects of the pollution here is to climb the hill behind our house and look at the stained black rocks and the stunted trees.

All that said, Sudbury today is very different from several decades ago. There has been an intensive tree planting and re-greening programme, and the big mining companies here (Inco and Falconbridge) have made considerable efforts to clean up their act. Lots of new houses are being built and real estate prices are currently rocketing upwards. Our house, which we bought in July 2005, would currently be put on the market at $17k above what we paid for it. It seems inevitable that cities north of Toronto will continue to grow, as the GTA can’t sustain endless expansion.

One of the main advantages to living in Ontario, particularly Northern Ontario, is that you experience four distinct seasons, a total contrast to the weather we experienced while living in England. Yes, winters are cold in Sudbury, and as I write this, there’s still some snow on the ground. But it’s a dry cold, which doesn’t chill your bones as much as damp weather. Plus in Sudbury, the majority of days are sunny, which really lifts your mood, and I think explains why people here seem so positive and happy about their lives.

Another plus to living in Sudbury is the diversity of its population and the lack of racism. We’ve been surprised to come across several people who have moved over from England, or have British ancestry. Around 30% of Sudbury’s population is French speaking and there is also a big Italian community here, as well as many immigrants from Finland and the Ukraine. Everyone just gets on with each other. Canadians in general are known for their friendliness, respect and tolerance, but no-where do those characteristics seem so prevalent as in Sudbury.

There are job opportunities here, although obviously not on the same scale as somewhere like Toronto. At the same time, because of the relatively small population (around 165,000), there are skills shortages in some areas and so you might be able to take advantage of the ‘big fish in a small pond’ scenario. Knowledge of French is a definite asset in the job market.

Living in, or close to Sudbury, gives you access to shopping, fantastic restaurants, good IT and communications infrastructure and a growing education sector. At the same time, it’s easy to explore the outdoors. Sudbury has two large lakes and two provincial parks within the city boundaries, as well many other beautiful parks and scenic areas to discover close by. This combination of city and country is one of the main reasons we enjoy living here so much. And if you really need a trip to the ‘big city,’ you can easily access Toronto or Ottawa in 4-5 hours.

So Sudbury is definitely on the up, a growing city. It may not have the job opportunities and night-life of Toronto, but we’re very happy here and are committed to staying and building our life in Northern Ontario"

Once again we urge you to drop by Hilary's web site www.truecanada.ca. 

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